Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$89.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.    Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Website“Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 2/13/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$89.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.    Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Website“Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 2/13/2023
    Presented
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Course1

Drafting Sales Agreements: UCC Issues and More

$89.00

The sale of goods is one of the most common forms of commercial transactions.  The sales contracts governing these transactions can be quite complex and they must all comply with the Uniform Commercial Code Article 2.  The UCC governs contract formation, express and implied warranties, and outlines forms of breach of contract and types of remedies.  Compliance with the code enhances enforceability of the contract and expedites remedies upon breach.  However, when its many requirements are overlooked, contracts for sale of goods may be invalid and the underlying transaction void. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting and reviewing contracts for the sale of goods under UCC Article 2.   “Battle of forms,” methods of acceptance or rejection, and electronic contracting Delivery, acceptance or rejection of goods by buyer Breaches for failure to deliver, non-conforming product, repudiation, failure to pay Types and measure of damages for breach of contract by seller or buyer Express and implied warranties – fitness for purpose, merchantability, title infringement Disclaimer of warranties and other techniques to limit scope of liability   Speaker: Christopher Tompkins is a partner in the Chicago office of Jenner & Block, LLP, where he counsels clients in such areas as breach of contract, the Uniform Commercial Code, equipment leasing, business torts, and intellectual property.  He has handled all phases of litigation in state and federal court and before arbitration tribunals, including pre-litigation investigation, motion practice, discovery, working with expert witnesses, trial and appeal.Previously, he served as a legislative intern for the National Council of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws where he worked on legislation related to commercial law.  Mr. Tompkins received his B.A., cum laude, from The Catholic University of America and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/9/2023
    Presented
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Course1

Drafting Sales Agreements: UCC Issues and More

$89.00

The sale of goods is one of the most common forms of commercial transactions.  The sales contracts governing these transactions can be quite complex and they must all comply with the Uniform Commercial Code Article 2.  The UCC governs contract formation, express and implied warranties, and outlines forms of breach of contract and types of remedies.  Compliance with the code enhances enforceability of the contract and expedites remedies upon breach.  However, when its many requirements are overlooked, contracts for sale of goods may be invalid and the underlying transaction void. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting and reviewing contracts for the sale of goods under UCC Article 2.   “Battle of forms,” methods of acceptance or rejection, and electronic contracting Delivery, acceptance or rejection of goods by buyer Breaches for failure to deliver, non-conforming product, repudiation, failure to pay Types and measure of damages for breach of contract by seller or buyer Express and implied warranties – fitness for purpose, merchantability, title infringement Disclaimer of warranties and other techniques to limit scope of liability   Speaker: Christopher Tompkins is a partner in the Chicago office of Jenner & Block, LLP, where he counsels clients in such areas as breach of contract, the Uniform Commercial Code, equipment leasing, business torts, and intellectual property.  He has handled all phases of litigation in state and federal court and before arbitration tribunals, including pre-litigation investigation, motion practice, discovery, working with expert witnesses, trial and appeal.Previously, he served as a legislative intern for the National Council of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws where he worked on legislation related to commercial law.  Mr. Tompkins received his B.A., cum laude, from The Catholic University of America and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/9/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Reps and Warranties in Business Transactions

$89.00

Representations and warranties are a marquee feature of virtually every significant transaction.  Parties often conduct extensive due diligence but want specific assurances about important facts about which only the company would have the best information. These facts – e.g., the absence of liabilities or the presence of certain authorizations – can be few or great in number, and they vary according to the facts of the transaction. They are essential to most transactions. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the differences between reps and warranties, the types and their remedies, and drafting.   Differences between reps and warranties, and their remedies Relationship between diligence and reps and warranties – and what the law says about how one impacts the other Reps and warranties concerning tangible and intangible property – title, taxes, transfer restrictions Provisions covering revenue projections, financial statements, and customer lists Understanding the limits of reps and warranties – what you can ask for, what you can get   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/10/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Reps and Warranties in Business Transactions

$89.00

Representations and warranties are a marquee feature of virtually every significant transaction.  Parties often conduct extensive due diligence but want specific assurances about important facts about which only the company would have the best information. These facts – e.g., the absence of liabilities or the presence of certain authorizations – can be few or great in number, and they vary according to the facts of the transaction. They are essential to most transactions. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the differences between reps and warranties, the types and their remedies, and drafting.   Differences between reps and warranties, and their remedies Relationship between diligence and reps and warranties – and what the law says about how one impacts the other Reps and warranties concerning tangible and intangible property – title, taxes, transfer restrictions Provisions covering revenue projections, financial statements, and customer lists Understanding the limits of reps and warranties – what you can ask for, what you can get   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/10/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$89.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.    Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Website“Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/13/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$89.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.    Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Website“Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/13/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 1

$89.00

Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/14/2023
    Presented
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Course1

Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 1

$89.00

Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/14/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 2

$89.00

Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/15/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 2

$89.00

Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/15/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 1

$89.00

Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/17/2023
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Live Replay: Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 2

$89.00

  Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.  

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/18/2023
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 1

$89.00

There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.    Day 1 September 27, 2022: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   Day 2 September 28, 2022: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/22/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 1

$89.00

There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.    Day 1 September 27, 2022: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   Day 2 September 28, 2022: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/22/2023
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 2

$89.00

There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.    Day 1 September 27, 2022: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   Day 2 September 28, 2022: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/23/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 2

$89.00

There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.    Day 1 September 27, 2022: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   Day 2 September 28, 2022: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/23/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Director and Officer Liability

$89.00

Statutory and common law impose certain fiduciary duties—care, diligence, good faith, and fair dealing—on directors and managers of corporate entities, managers of LLCs, and in certain instances members of LLCs. The corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines also operate to restrict the activity of closely held company stakeholders, preventing misappropriation of certain corporate or LLC opportunities. In certain instances, the owners of the entity may want to expand, limit, or even entirely eliminate these duties. Depending on the entity involved and the specific duty, the law may allow modification by agreement, but unintended consequences may be substantial. This program provides you with a practical guide to fiduciary duties in corporations and LLCs, how they may be modified, and the possible consequences.    Fiduciary duties in closely held corporations and LLCs• Corporate fiduciary duties and standards of review—duty of loyalty and duty of care Conflicts of interest and self-dealing issues in closely held corporations Fiduciary duties in LLCs—standards set by contract and by law Which duties may be modified or eliminated—and which may not  How the corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines work in closely held companies.   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where he advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions. He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the ABA Business Law Section Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee. He is also a Certified Public Accountant. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/27/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Director and Officer Liability

$89.00

Statutory and common law impose certain fiduciary duties—care, diligence, good faith, and fair dealing—on directors and managers of corporate entities, managers of LLCs, and in certain instances members of LLCs. The corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines also operate to restrict the activity of closely held company stakeholders, preventing misappropriation of certain corporate or LLC opportunities. In certain instances, the owners of the entity may want to expand, limit, or even entirely eliminate these duties. Depending on the entity involved and the specific duty, the law may allow modification by agreement, but unintended consequences may be substantial. This program provides you with a practical guide to fiduciary duties in corporations and LLCs, how they may be modified, and the possible consequences.   • Fiduciary duties in closely held corporations and LLCs• Corporate fiduciary duties and standards of review—duty of loyalty and duty of care• Conflicts of interest and self-dealing issues in closely held corporations• Fiduciary duties in LLCs—standards set by contract and by law• Which duties may be modified or eliminated—and which may not• How the corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines work in closely held companies.   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where he advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions. He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the ABA Business Law Section Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee. He is also a Certified Public Accountant. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/27/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$89.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.    Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Website“Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/29/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$89.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.    Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Website“Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/29/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Earnouts: Taking a Wait and See Approach to Valuation of Closely Held Companies

$89.00

The most highly negotiated provision of most transactions is price. Sellers want to maximize the value of the deal, putting the most optimistic spin historical and forward-looking projections.  Sellers take a more skeptical view, questioning the sustainability of growth and the accuracy of forecasts.  When differences over valuation cannotbe bridged, the parties may use an earnout, which allows them to both take a wait-and-see approach and still close the transaction. Earnouts generally involve a current payment from buyer to seller together with ongoing payments to the seller if the company performs as the seller projected.  But there are many drafting and operational traps when using earnouts.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to structuring and drafting earnouts to later disputes and litigation.   Most highly negotiated and litigated provisions in earnout agreements Post-closing operations – control by buyer, but informational access to seller Defining key metrics – objective, measurable and potential traps Relationship of earnouts to senior debt and other preferential returns Debt issues and how it impacts financial results – and post-closing payments How earnouts are different than escrow and holdbacks   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Daniel G. Straga is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and his B.A. from the University of Delaware. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/30/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Earnouts: Taking a Wait and See Approach to Valuation of Closely Held Companies

$89.00

The most highly negotiated provision of most transactions is price. Sellers want to maximize the value of the deal, putting the most optimistic spin historical and forward-looking projections.  Sellers take a more skeptical view, questioning the sustainability of growth and the accuracy of forecasts.  When differences over valuation cannotbe bridged, the parties may use an earnout, which allows them to both take a wait-and-see approach and still close the transaction. Earnouts generally involve a current payment from buyer to seller together with ongoing payments to the seller if the company performs as the seller projected.  But there are many drafting and operational traps when using earnouts.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to structuring and drafting earnouts to later disputes and litigation.   Most highly negotiated and litigated provisions in earnout agreements Post-closing operations – control by buyer, but informational access to seller Defining key metrics – objective, measurable and potential traps Relationship of earnouts to senior debt and other preferential returns Debt issues and how it impacts financial results – and post-closing payments How earnouts are different than escrow and holdbacks   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Daniel G. Straga is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and his B.A. from the University of Delaware. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 3/30/2023
    Presented
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Due Diligence in Business Transactions

$89.00

Due diligence, often guided by lawyers, is essential to the success of major business transactions and poorly planned or conducted diligence can contribute to a buyer not getting the benefit of its bargain.  Diligence helps confirm essential assumptions about the value of a transaction and aids the discovery of unknown liabilities. There’s also a subtle relationship between the content of diligence and the time allowed to conduct it.  In more robust market environments, sellers have the upper hand and can limit diligence, making the process about time allocation and risk management. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning the diligence process, understanding the most important areas of inquiry depending on the type of transaction, and review checklists.   What to diligence, utilizing experts, and managing the process and time Impact of market environment on the length and scope of diligence Checklists – what information do you need to get, from whom, and on what timeline? Hard assets v. soft assets – how to diligence the validity and title to each Contracts with suppliers and customers – ensuring stability and visibility of revenue Financial records and statements – what should attorneys look for?   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/2/2023
    Avail. Until
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Due Diligence in Business Transactions

$89.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/4/2023
    Presented
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Course1

Due Diligence in Business Transactions

$89.00

To Be Determined

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/4/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 1

$89.00

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions.   Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs   Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/12/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 1

$89.00

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions.   Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs   Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/12/2023
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 2

$89.00

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions.   Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs   Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/13/2023
    Presented
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